The Law of Love

My last post had to do with obedience. May more things could be said about obedience, however, I would like to reflect on the word love, since that is the sum of God’s law.

“Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might. And these words that I command you today shall be on your heart. You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise. You shall bind them as a sign on your hand, and they shall be as frontlets between your eyes. You shall write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates.” (Deuteronomy 6:4–9, ESV)

Much of what I hear today sets the focus of love on ones’ self. We talk about how much God loves me, or God loves the poor, or God loves sinners. Yet the Law of Love is not about how God loves but how we love. More to the point, how we love God. There is a song sung by Michael W. Smith that says,

I’m coming back to the heart of worship
And it’s all about you, it’s all about you Jesus
I’m sorry Lord, for the thing I’ve made it
When it’s all about you, it’s all about you Jesus [1]

The problem is that all too often it is all about me. “I don’t like that song,” or “The preacher sure was boring today, I couldn’t even follow him,” or “When are they going to put new carpet in the sanctuary,” or “I wonder what the score of the game is.” If it is all about God and Christ, then none of these other things are important. And the trouble is that we are commanded to love ther Lord our God.

This is difficult to do, maybe impossible. Remember, though, that the standard is to yeild to the power and authority of the Holy Spirit and not expect sanctification results too quickly. On the other hand, we must also remember that there are three qualifiers God uses describing how we are to go about loving him: with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your might. It’s getting harder, isn’t it.

When God commands us to do something, he often shows us how to do it. In this passage, he declares that fulfilling his command to love is to be taught to our children. We should talk about loving God all the time, “when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise. You shall bind them as a sign on your hand, and they shall be as frontlets between your eyes. You shall write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates.” 

The Hebrews out of an honest desire to fulfill God’s command took this part too far. They created philacteries[2] for their foreheads and the mezuzah [3] for their doors. I reality, these are mnemonic devices may or may not work, and I am certainly not condemning them here. I think, though, that what God wants us to do is to slowly but surely place his word in the forefront of our lives until our first reaction to any situation is, “How can I love God?”

In the end, it is all about God who created the heavens and the earth and placed them in human custody that we could, in all things, make known his great glory. I only pray that I continue to make progress toward that end.

 

[1] copied from https://www.lyricsfreak.com/m/michael+w+smith/all+about+you_20609001.html

[2] Phylacteries contain copies of the four biblical passages upon which their usage is based: Exod 13:9, 16; Deut 6:8; 11:18. They serve as a ritual reminder of the covenantal commitment to keep the Torah of Moses and to thank God for His many blessings. Paul A. Rainbow, The Lexham Bible Dictionary, 2016.

[3] …a small box, containing scrolls bearing the same four verses, mounted to the right doorpost of the house and of each room. Paul A. Rainbow, The Lexham Bible Dictionary, 2016.

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Filed under Law of God, Love

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