Category Archives: Hate

From there He will come to judge the living and the dead.

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him. Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God. And this is the judgment: the light has come into the world, and people loved the darkness rather than the light because their works were evil. For everyone who does wicked things hates the light and does not come to the light, lest his works should be exposed. But whoever does what is true comes to the light, so that it may be clearly seen that his works have been carried out in God.”

John 3:16–21, ESV

These verses in John 3 are rarely read together in today’s churches. The focus of the gospel has shifted to almost exclusively the love of God. Thus, Jesus, who says, “For God so loved the world,” is translated into “since God loves the world, that must include everyone in the world.” Our God is not only the author of salvation, but he is also the judge of sinners. Jesus made clear that he was not sent into the world to judge (condemnation), but that there is condemnation already present among those who do not believe. The unbeliever has reaped condemnation because “the light has come into the world, and people loved the darkness.” How do we know this to be true? “For everyone who does wicked things hates the light…”

Jesus was not wasting his words. When he spoke, he spoke truth. These verses are the gospel message. They cannot be separated from one another. None of these words are difficult to comprehend. Whenever and wherever the gospel is preached, both salvation for belief and condemnation for unbelief must be a part of the conversation. One without the other denies the gospel as proclaimed by Jesus.

The Jesus loves me gospel has become such a focus in many churches that the gospel has become something like fire insurance. If you don’t believe, you are going to hell, but if you do believe, you will go to heaven. Furthermore, belief does not have to be anything more than an altar call a person is tricked into going down for. Music, worship space, preaching are all laid out for an emotional response. They demand a response of feeling guilty. However, those who feel guilty do so regarding a few specific sins they have committed. Unfortunately, the individual does not recognize that everything he does is in some way steeped in his or her sin nature.

So, such individuals may pick up the language of modern Christianity or even start attending church occasionally. But there has not been a fundamental change in their life. They think everything is good between them and God. Yet, when Junior has a soccer game that conflicts with the gathering of Christ’s body for worship, they choose the soccer game. After all, God would certainly want us to support our child in his activities. That is what good parenting is all about. Few think that Junior should not be playing a sport instead of the communion of the saints with voices raised in worship.

Nevertheless, our culture demands to be our first love. The temptation to love the world is strong. I know it well. What helps me are two things: the love of God who called me to serve him and the fear of God’s wrath. This may sound odd to many but think back to when you were a child. I hated doing yard work, but my dad would assign some chores for me to accomplish before he came home. I would put off going outside to work as long as I could. Yet, there always came a time when I decided my father’s praise was much better than his wrath and disappointment.


Blessed is the man 
      who walks not in the counsel of the wicked, 
      nor stands in the way of sinners, 
      nor sits in the seat of scoffers; 
      but his delight is in the law of the LORD, 
      and on his law he meditates day and night. 

      He is like a tree 
      planted by streams of water 
      that yields its fruit in its season, 
      and its leaf does not wither. 
      In all that he does, he prospers. 
      The wicked are not so, 
      but are like chaff that the wind drives away. 

      Therefore the wicked will not stand in the judgment, 
      nor sinners in the congregation of the righteous; 
      for the LORD knows the way of the righteous, 
      but the way of the wicked will perish.
(Psalm 1, ESV)

With this background, we may now turn to the Creed. It has presented the birth, suffering, death, resurrection, and ascent to sit at the right hand of the Father. “From there, he will come to judge the living and the dead.” The idea of judging the living and the dead could mean that Jesus will judge those who are alive when he returns, and the dead are those who have died before his return. I don’t really think this is an adequate interpretation. The living are those who have been born again and the dead are those who are wicked.

How will Jesus judge?

“When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, then he will sit on his glorious throne. Before him will be gathered all the nations, and he will separate people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. And he will place the sheep on his right, but the goats on the left. Then the King will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world. For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you clothed me, I was sick and you visited me, I was in prison and you came to me.’ Then the righteous will answer him, saying, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you drink? And when did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you? And when did we see you sick or in prison and visit you?’ And the King will answer them, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.’ “Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels. For I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me no drink, I was a stranger and you did not welcome me, naked and you did not clothe me, sick and in prison and you did not visit me.’ Then they also will answer, saying, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or sick or in prison, and did not minister to you?’ Then he will answer them, saying, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did not do it to one of the least of these, you did not do it to me.’ And these will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life.”

Matthew 25:31–46, ESV

Jesus uses the metaphor of a shepherd separating sheep from goats. The difference between them is demonstrated by their works. James wrote that “faith without works is dead.” Jesus had John write 7 letters to the 7 primary churches in Asia. Below is the one he wrote to the Ephesians.

 ‘I know your works, your toil and your patient endurance, and how you cannot bear with those who are evil, but have tested those who call themselves apostles and are not, and found them to be false. I know you are enduring patiently and bearing up for my name’s sake, and you have not grown weary. But I have this against you, that you have abandoned the love you had at first. Remember therefore from where you have fallen; repent, and do the works you did at first. If not, I will come to you and remove your lampstand from its place, unless you repent. Yet this you have: you hate the works of the Nicolaitans, which I also hate. He who has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the churches. To the one who conquers I will grant to eat of the tree of life, which is in the paradise of God.’

Revelation 2:2–7, ESV

The other six also refer to works, either by praising or condemning. Paul presents the fruit of the Spirit in Galatians as a picture of true Christianity. These characteristics are the natural outworking of the Holy Spirit sanctifying us. For those who remain true to Christ, especially in times of trial, there is a promised crown as reward.

Blessed is the man who remains steadfast under trial, for when he has stood the test he will receive the crown of life, which God has promised to those who love him.” (James 1:12, ESV)

Henceforth there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, will award to me on that day, and not only to me but also to all who have loved his appearing.” (2 Timothy 4:8, ESV)

And when the chief Shepherd appears, you will receive the unfading crown of glory.” (1 Peter 5:4, ESV)

With this knowledge, we are responsible for judging all things in our culture. We are not called to condemn people but to judge the righteousness of works. The past few weeks, we have had a clear indication of the hearts of humanity apart from God. Allow me to explain.

Kyle Rittenhouse was placed on trial for killing two and wounding one during a Black Lives Matter riot. In the end, the jury declared that Kyle was not guilty. Yet, so many media commentators are rehashing their initial judgments of the incident ignoring the facts that the jury found as false since that time. There is a narrative being pushed on the American people, a narrative that has divided is preaching racism, that has crushed good people saying that all white people are racists, that has ruined the reputations of people who have done nothing wrong but offer a cool drink to those who are thirsty.

We are being told what is up is down, right is left, men are unnecessary, men can become pregnant, all white people are racist, conservative blacks are white supremacists, and more. So many lies that if repeated often enough by the majority of the media, many will eventually come to believe. We as a people have lost our first love: a love of liberty, a love of federalism, a love of objective morality, a love of order, and more. Yet our first and greatest love that is all but forgotten is our love of neighbor, our love of righteousness, and our love of God.

Let us be clear about the gospel in our churches. Let us be honest about the gospel in our preaching and evangelism. And let us not fear rejection no matter how harsh. It is God our Father and Christ our Lord who work all things. It is not our job to change hearts or lives. It is our job to shine the light everywhere. It will reveal what needs to be revealed. The Holy Spirit will work in the hearts of those who are called.

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Everything is Racist?

“And since they did not see fit to acknowledge God, God gave them up to a debased mind to do what ought not to be done. They were filled with all manner of unrighteousness, evil, covetousness, malice. They are full of envy, murder, strife, deceit, maliciousness. They are gossips, slanderers, haters of God, insolent, haughty, boastful, inventors of evil, disobedient to parents, foolish, faithless, heartless, ruthless. Though they know God’s righteous decree that those who practice such things deserve to die, they not only do them but give approval to those who practice them.”

Romans 1:28–32 (ESV)

I can’t help but think that all of America has gone mad. Every day, someone somewhere claims that something in normal life is racist. For example, go here. Some of these sources claim to some sort of expertise whether as journalists, politicians, university professors, or theologians. Some of Paul’s inspired words for these people include envy, foolish, heartless, and ruthless. Their baseless claims are slanderous and come from their hatred of God.

One might wonder why the most patriotic citizens in our country came from other countries to seek freedom. Yes, the freedom they celebrate is the same freedom others so easily denigrate. The sad part of our freedom of speech is that so many use it to freely express their inventions of evil, or maybe it’s just their ignorance. So many victims born in the United States!

The liberty so many generations fought and died for is the freedom to work hard in order to provide for family and self. It is the freedom to help others in need and to be self-governing good people. It is the freedom to fail, get up again, and amend our ways. It is the freedom to forgive.

Some people say time changes all things. I say that it is not time that changes things, it is sin that takes all that is good and transforms it into everything that is bad. Freedom to be righteous has become freedom to be self-righteous. Freedom to make one’s way through life has become a desire for a free ride. True caring for the poor or the oppressed has become public theft through illegitimate taxation that people who choose not to be responsible are essentially paid to remain irresponsible.

Ultimately, the greatest deception of sin, in my opinion, is to make us believe that hatred of our condition is actually a love of ourselves. Equal opportunity has become equal outcome whether the outcome is earned or not. When the outcome is desired but not earned, it is tragically wasted. Working for something validates the value of the thing worked for. To receive something for nothing makes the something worth nothing. Liberty that does not cost a weighty price is not liberty. It is merely licentiousness.

God says through Paul that because people refuse to worship God, he gives them up to their own depraved thinking. Apart from submission to the Creator, there is no meaning and no value in anything. So, in the mind of those who deny God the status and glory that is his by right, everything is racist because “of no value, that which is worthless” is the real definition of the word racism. And Americans now reap what Americans have sown.

All value is derivative from the only One who is ultimately valuable, the Triune God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. God has endowed his creation with value. This is especially true in regards to human beings, for we are created in God’s image. We were made to reflect the glory of God as mirrors of that glory. The image I see in a mirror is not me, but it is a representation of me. Therefore, we are not Gods but we were made to be representations of him. This explains why animals do not create things of beauty. We can see their beauty as creatures of God’s handiwork, but only human beings write poetry or great symphonies. Only those who bear the image of the creative God are creators of art, architecture, technology, and more. God gives us the raw material and using the knowledge, holiness, and righteousness within us we use this material to create wonderful things.

God’s goodness and grace are displayed in that even humans who refuse in sin to worship God use what God made them to be and create, rule creation, and work for one another. It rains on the righteous and the unrighteous and waters their crops the same. At the same time, the wickedness of the unrighteous is also displayed when they oppress and murder, hate and destroy, cheat and steal. How do we know this? By the reality that God’s love, righteousness, and justice have never completely disappeared from his creation.

Moreover, God entered his creation in Jesus Christ and showed us once again how valuable his creation and his people are. Our value is the very life of Jesus, who was crucified to pay for our sin. His work was finished on the cross which was proven effective by his resurrection from the dead. The good news did not stop there, for, on his coronation day, he ascended to heaven to take his throne and fulfill his rule over the earth. (May the Lord forgive us for no longer celebrating Ascension Day.)

This is why Paul could boldly claim that haters of God deserved to die. He did not say it was our job to kill them, only that they deserved death. Denial of God is the denial of everything that is. Applying this to our country means that making claims of racism where no racism exists is proof of the rejection of God and his creation. Is there such a thing as racism? Has the government of the United States of America done injustice and evil? Yes, but the standard is the one set by the Creator and Law Giver to whom everyone and every institution owes obedience and worship.

Our judgment is not what condemns people, for only Jesus Christ has been given that function. Yet, we are to judge others’ actions so that we can strive to counter their wickedness with righteousness and justice. Please notice that I did not say “social justice.” Social justice is the creation of sinful man. It may be dressed up as God’s justice, but there is no substitute for the real thing. Social justice condemns. God’s justice displays his glory. God’s justice corrects evil, cares for victims of evil, and restores wholeness.

God’s justice has dealt with the injustice of racism. The United States paid a huge price for the lives destroyed by the legalized slave trade. But God’s justice prevailed and slavery was ended. Many black Americans paid a huge price for the Jim Crow laws. But God’s justice prevailed and discrimination was made illegal. In neither of these events did justice happen overnight. Today, there are still some vestiges of discrimination. Nevertheless, Jesus Christ rules from heaven and is recreating the earth according to the New Covenant. Now, as I see it, you can either scream about perceived racism and injustice, you can demand to get something for nothing, or you can actually receive something without cost, the grace of God in salvation from sin, and you can join the reclamation work of the Lord.

“Owe no one anything, except to love each other, for the one who loves another has fulfilled the law. For the commandments, ‘You shall not commit adultery, You shall not murder, You shall not steal, You shall not covet,’ and any other commandment, are summed up in this word: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ Love does no wrong to a neighbor; therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.

Romans 13:8–10 (ESV)

“…the kingdom of God is not a matter of eating and drinking but of righteousness and peace and joy in the Holy Spirit.

Romans 14:17 (ESV)

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The Sky is Falling, Again

It should not be necessary to rehearse the tale of Chicken Little. I have used it before, and I continue to stand by my conclusions then. Just because people run around worried about “the end of the world” coming, whatever that may mean, it does not mean they are correct. Should we be concerned about how we care for nature? Of course, we should. However, my concern is very different than the concern of the climate change chickens or the humane treatment of animals littles. My concern is and always has been the call of humankind to exercise dominion over God’s creation to the end of his glory. Think about it. To treat animals humanely is to elevate their created status to humanity. But, they are still only animals. Why is it not enough to teach our children to treat animals as godly caretakers? Why should we avoid destroying the earth so it will last longer instead of caring for God’s creation so that he continues to be glorified?

The answer is that sin controls humanity, and human beings continue to bow to the false god of their own desires. What makes this seem like the end may be near is that we are so good at justifying ourselves and imagining that we can be God. The more life crumbles around us, the more we need to hear and believe the truth. We are not God; we are not gods. Any time we attempt to control life and creation as if we are the creator, we pervert the true creation with our hubris and arrogance. If that is all that we can see, then the apocalyptic end is all we can conclude. We fight harder to control, and we die all the faster.

The current method by which a few are attempting to control the world is through what has been called Critical Social Theory and the child it has born called Critical Race Theory. The main issue I have with Critical Theories is that they tend to forget they are only theories and that those in the popular movements pushing them don’t really know what they are. Like other bandwagons, they may look good from the outside because the inside can be argued against. The forward to Voddie Baucham’s book “Fault Lines” presents a brief but solid history of Critical Theory and an explanation of just what Critical Race Theorists say they mean. The Church has erred because they have not recognized that Critical Social Theory is a worldview, and it is in conflict with the Biblical Worldview.

However, Baucham writes with an interest in what has become known as Social Justice. His metaphor of a fault line is to demonstrate that there such a line in the Church that, when the plates shift, there will be a chasm in the Church that the members of the Church may see coming. He writes:

Why are people and groups like Thabiti Anyabwile, Tim Keller, Russell Moore, the Southern Baptist Convention, the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, 9Marks, the Gospel Coalition, and Together for the Gospel (T4G) being identified with Critical Social Justice on one side of the fault, and people like John MacArthur, Tom Ascol, Owen Strachan, Douglas Wilson, and the late R.C. Sproul being identified on the other? These are groups and ministries that have embraced CRT, and those are problematic. But there is a larger group that is sympathetic to it because of their desire to fight what they see as a problem of racial injustice.

Baucham, Voddie. Fault Lines: the Social Justice Movement and Evangelicalism’s Looming Catastrophe. Salem Books, an Imprint of Regnery Publishing, 2021; pp. 2-3.

There are many reviews of the book online. This is not my purpose. The only point I wish to make is that Baucham does not believe that the issue in America today is ethnicity or politics. His thesis is that the problem we face globally and in the Church is the difference between Social Justice and Biblical Justice. I would not argue his point. Fundamentally speaking, the world has always faced the war between God and man, God’s justice or man’s justice. This has been my “bottom line.”

I do not write today to try to solve the problem between the world and the Bible. I write because I see this more significant problem affecting the Church. The reason is that there has been a change in the Church from the earliest days where Luke says, “And they devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.” (Acts 2:42, ESV) The first change is the lack of devotion to the Apostle’s Teaching. The sermon in our Churches has become a platform for psychology, good feelings, and being uplifted. What has become lost is that all of these can only be the result of devotion to the Apostle’s Teaching or teaching the whole counsel of God. Emphasis on preaching has become an emphasis on form, delivery, and the ability of the preacher to captivate the ears of those listening. The shame is that such an emphasis does not enhance listening. It deadens it because no one can captivate another all the time, and anytime someone fails to be engaged in what is being said, it isn’t easy to recapture their wandering mind. Furthermore, captivation often leads to tributary thinking, i.e., daydreaming.

Everyone wants to believe that Christ calls the imperfect and the weak to confound the wise and strong. This is a commonly accepted Christian truth, except when it comes to a pastor and especially when it comes to their preaching. For some reason, pastors receive the harshest criticisms from those who have not heard the sermon because they excuse their failure to listen to the pastor’s content or delivery. I have been in the same pew at times, but I know the truth that the content of the Word of God is what captivates and lifts my heart. On the other hand, my ears need to be disciplined and trained, two other functions of the Word.

Likewise, genuine fellowship suffers in the church. The feeling of being ignored is familiar. Even when greeted by others, the sense of true love is vacant. We live in a world where it is easy to smile and ask, “How are you doing?” never listening for an answer, never wanting one either. This has nothing to do with the size of the congregation. The group Luke speaks of began with about 160 and ended the day with 3,160! Fellowship is much more than a greeting, even by passing the peace. When Paul speaks of fellowship, he speaks of partnering in the ministry (Philippians 1:3-5). He shares a love that prays even when the other person is not there. John likens our fellowship to the fellowship we have with the Father through the Son (1 John 1:3).

Then there is the breaking of bread. I believe this refers to the Sacrament of the Lord’s Supper. In his Gospel, Luke writes of two discouraged disciples on their way home after the crucifixion. A stranger joins them, and they fellowship along the way. But when the stranger “breaks bread” with them, they suddenly recognize him as Jesus, the one who was crucified. This story demonstrates to us the power of the Eucharist. If the Sacrament reveals to us the presence of the crucified and resurrected savior, why don’t we make it the point to which all worship climbs? “If we take it too often it will loose its specialness.” How can the Eucharist ever lose its specialness? It is the remembrance of Christ, the Lamb of God slain for us. I make it irrelevant in my heart and soul, just as I make Christ irrelevant in my daily life.

The last item is prayer. Sometimes I think the death of prayer occurred when we made prayer a spontaneous activity. We don’t know what to pray because we don’t know how to pray, even though Jesus taught us how to pray. When I was in elementary school, I would walk up the street to my best friend’s house so we could walk together. I was always invited in, and their whole family, along with anyone else there, would hold hands and pray the Lord’s Prayer. His house, by the way, was the only one I knew that had a large picture of Jesus on the wall at the front door. Empty repetition? No. Training in righteousness. Throughout the history of the Church, there have been various disciplines for prayer. No one had to wonder what to pray for because they were raised with praying and prayers. My first experience with this was before I could read or write, but when I was tucked into bed at night, I would say, “Now I lay me down to sleep…”

Why do we struggle with discerning that which is just? Because we do not know what God calls just. Why do we think that God’s love is equally dispensed to all people everywhere? Because we do not know what God calls love. Why do we think we should favor stealing from one person to give it to another who is poorer? Why do we think guns are the greatest evil and should be kept out of the hands of good people? Why do we even consider that someone who has never been a slave and has not been related to a slave for a hundred years or more should receive special treatment from everyone else? What is justice? What is right? What is wrong?

If you are not interested in devoting yourself to Christ, to the Church, and to the ministry of the Gospel, then quit trying to tell me that I am unjust or a racist because I am a white male. My days are running short in this world, and I only care about one thing: Jesus Christ, who was crucified for my sins and who, by his Spirit and with his Word, leads me in the paths of righteousness for his name’s sake. I will crawl through any valley because I belong to him. And he belongs to me. All who are Christ’s, come, let us crawl together planting the seed of truth along the way.

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With Liberty and Justice for All

“You shall appoint judges and officers in all your towns that the Lord your God is giving you, according to your tribes, and they shall judge the people with righteous judgment. You shall not pervert justice. You shall not show partiality, and you shall not accept a bribe, for a bribe blinds the eyes of the wise and subverts the cause of the righteous. Justice, and only justice, you shall follow, that you may live and inherit the land that the Lord your God is giving you.

Deuteronomy 16:18–20, ESV

For over a year, we have heard cries in the streets for justice. Justice for Blacks, Hispanics, Asians, and whoever is not White. Cities have been virtually decimated while the news outlets call the protests mostly peaceful. The rhetoric has dominated all media: America is systemically racist. Whiteness is a disease. I see no need to debate whether there is systemic racism or any kind of racism in our nation, our institutions, or in any sense. The point may be argued, but who will listen? Who is willing to sit down and calmly discuss the issues? Who actually cares enough to seek a real solution that results in justice for all.

How sad it is that whoever yells the loudest wins the argument? Even sadder yet is that those who yell the loudest are also the most ignorant, in my opinion. Yelling and screaming have overtaken rational debate. And this kind of silliness has been granted permission by none other than the President. Kate Slater wrote this:

On Jan. 20, President Joe Biden became the first in U.S. history to explicitly name “the sting of systemic racism” in his inaugural address. With this deliberate and specific use of the term, Biden was drawing attention to the deep-seated racial inequities in America.

https://www.today.com/tmrw/what-systemic-racism-t207878

The debate is purely emotional. Not only is systemic racism a claim being made, but it is also a toothless claim. If there were evidences for the fact rather than emotional whining that the claim is valid, there would be a rational debate. But there is no debate. We are told to believe it is true just because. And we are expected to believe it is confirmed by the supposed victims of racism.

For example, the hollow organization Black Lives Matter has collected millions of dollars in donations to further the cause of defeating racism. Too bad. The donors were shellacked as the leaders frivolously spent the funds on themselves. So much for racism. The message is to the everyday person, “Every man for himself!” as the ship of truth sinks in the cold seas of empty rhetoric. It sounds nice. It even rings true. But the more profound lesson is that “There’s a sucker born every minute.” Confronted with the reality, the racism battle carries on.

Justice is more than an ideological option. Justice can be defined, and any discussion about the social conditions today that are called unjust cannot occur without such a definition. Every politician knows that definition of terms is the first thing to be scuttled if any campaign is to succeed. You do not need to speak the truth. Instead, you must sound like you speak the truth. Truth divides those who can hear it and those who cannot. To win elections, you cannot take a stand. Case in point: Joe Biden did virtually nothing to campaign for the presidency. He should have thought about that years ago. He may have become president sooner.

In Hebrew, the concept of judgment and justice is mostly commonly expressed with the term שׁפט (šāpaṭ), which means “to govern” or “to administer justice,” and its related noun מִשְׁפָט (mišpāṭ, “judgment”). Another set of Hebrew terms related to justice in the OT includes the noun צֶדֶק (ṣedeq, “righteousness”) and its related verb צָדֹק (ṣādōq, “to be or make righteous”). Depending on context, the Septuagint uses Greek words related to the terms δικαιοσύνη (dikaiosynē, “righteousness”) or κρίνω (krinō, “to judge”) to translate these Hebrew words. The NT mostly follows the Septuagint’s terminology for justice. For example, the NT uses terms derived from the δικ- (dik-) word group to express positive forms of judgment (e.g., “legally righteous,” “innocent,” or “justify”) and words related to κρίνω (krinō) to express more negative forms of judgment (e.g., “lawsuit,” “verdict,” or “condemn”). Neither set of words solely refers to negative or positive judgments; in each case, the context will determine the most likely connotation of a particular term related to justice. The Bible also contains many less-frequently used Hebrew and Greek terms that denote various persons and types of judgments.

Jeremiah K. Garrett, Lexham Theological Wordbook, 2014.

Justice, according to the Creator, is foundational to morality. It is about discerning right from wrong. We know that such discernment is difficult or impossible at times. Solomon could have simply given the baby to its mother, but he had to prove to the combatants who really loved the child as a wise judge. No matter how hard justice may be, it is an absolute necessity to any peaceful social system. From the earliest times in Jewish history, God has called for the appointment of righteous judges. There is no room for favoritism in justice. This is one reason that the arguments demanding racial justice fall flat today.

The initial solution to the racial question is that blacks are to be favored over whites. Blacks deserve such favoritism due to the injustice of slavery. It doesn’t matter that no black has been enslaved in America in their generation, or even the generation before them. We are told that the institution of black slavery has had long-lasting effects. Once again, claims are made from emotional rhetoric without solid substance. The is a gap between whites and blacks economically, it is said. The truth is that this “poverty” gap is not universal to the black experience. There are too many African Americans who did not join gangs or deal drugs. There are too many who worked for their education and worked for their advancement and position. There are too many successful African Americans. The same is true for every race in America.

Justice demands an objective moral standard. It cannot float along with every wind of change. The universal human experience is that life is change. We grow, we learn, we gain wisdom (hopefully.) Yet, the foundation must be a rock. Building on sand always ends in failure.

Moreover, the only rock worthy of being our foundation for justice is the Son of God, who suffered injustice greater than anyone on earth. He is the rock David sang about in the Psalms. He is the cornerstone of the Kingdom of God, according to Paul.

The painful truth is that injustice always cries out for righteous judgment. There is only one who is capable of such judgment, Jesus the Messiah. “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” (John 14:6, ESV) “And there is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved.”” (Acts 4:12, ESV)

Anyone who truly seeks salvation from the humanistic problems of antinomianism and false faith in governments and people, turn to Jesus Christ, who knows your pain and frustration, and the only one who can do something about it. Stop listening to foolishness and seek wisdom and justice in Christ, which always results in freedom. “…you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.” (John 8:32, ESV)

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Filed under Faith, Hate, Humanism, Racism, Truth

Who Are You?

But the evil spirit answered them, “Jesus I know, and Paul I recognize, but who are you?”” (Acts 19:15, ESV)

The answer to the question is of great importance today. Why? Because we are being told that we can be anyone we want to be. We can choose who we are. Unless, that is, we want to defend our choice. Then we can claim we were “born” that way. Jesus told Nicodemus he must be born again, but I don’t think he meant that we can choose to be reborn as whatever we want.

Genetic testing has become very popular. You send off a sample and a chunk of change to some lab that will send back to you how much of what area of the world you are from. I have loved watching the You Tube videos of people trembling as they open their results and their sudden dejection in discovering they are primarily European. People want to be African, Hispanic, Asian, anything other than white. White is the new group against which Americans hate. After all, it was whites who enslaved blacks. It was whites who formed America as a racist nation. It is whites who have all the advantages today.

I am white. I am not ashamed of being white. I don’t need a genetic test to prove it. My mother’s parents were born of Norwegian immigrants. After taking a trip to Norway in 2000, I have become rather pleased at this part of my heritage. My father’s parents were born of a long line of English that arrived in America before it was America. I’m happy about that too because my family participated in the American Revolution fighting for liberty. Whether or not any of my relations were involved in the purchase or use of slaves may be a part of my history, but it is not a part of who I am. It is the same about those whose name I bear who courageously fought to form an Independent nation. If I have any courage, it is not something genetically passed to me.

However, because I am white, I am naturally the object of racist oppression. I doubt I need to offer evidence for this because it is freely accessible on the internet, in universities, in news reporting, on television, in professional sports; this prejudicial mantra is everywhere in America. Why, even our Vice President, who is Jamaican/white and Indian claims she is black. One of the candidates for President claimed to be Native American when she was nothing of the sort. And recently, on her AppleTV program, Oprah demonstratively said that if you have any white blood at all, you have an advantage over everyone else. I guess Kamala had an advantage?

Race is not the only place people try to claim what they are not because they are ashamed of who they are. Gender is another. Bruce Jenner decided he was Katlin because he felt that way. He took the ultimate rout undergoing surgery to make his dreams come true. Yet they didn’t. Why is it that genetics matter so much with race but not at all with gender? My education taught me that science was objectively based on controlled experiments consistently producing the same results. Science could be trusted. Weeeelllll – not really. The scientific method can only confirm male and female genders. It cannot confirm any deviation from these two options. That is because there is not other option. Everything passed off today as LGBTQ+ falls under the realm of behavior, not identity. (I know that this is not popular to say, but facts can’t be manipulated in a universe of Truth).

Same sex (meaning gender) marriage is a cultural acceptance of a deviant lifestyle. To make such things culturally good has only two purposes. First, it allows people to do whatever they want and second, it allows them to feel good about it. I have laughed and cried over those who call others who oppose this behavior as haters, Nazis, and Fascists. Then they apply fascist tactics to force them to comply with the new morality. Just ask the baker who was not allowed to practice free enterprise and choice when baking wedding cakes.

Fascism (/ˈfæʃɪzəm/) is a form of far-rightauthoritarianultranationalism characterized by dictatorial power, forcible suppression of opposition and strong regimentation of society and of the economy which came to prominence in early 20th-century Europe.

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Fascism

…a political philosophy, movement, or regime (such as that of the Fascisti) that exalts nation and often race above the individual and that stands for a centralized autocratic government headed by a dictatorial leader, severe economic and social regimentation, and forcible suppression of opposition.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fascism

The point in all of this is that who you are is not who you choose to be. It is who you are, and no one can claim superiority or inferiority because of it. However, who you are has become confused with what you believe and what you do.

Acts 19 presents the truth. Imposters attempted to advance their reputations and their pockets by attempting an exorcism in the name of “Jesus who Paul proclaims”. There is irony in the fact that it is an evil spirit who calls them out on their charade. “But the evil spirit answered them, “Jesus I know, and Paul I recognize, but who are you?”” The exorcists wanted to be something they weren’t. What they missed is that not even Paul claimed any special power. “And God was doing extraordinary miracles by the hands of Paul,” (Acts 19:11, ESV). Paul was not performing miracles, God was. Paul knew who he was, a vessel used by God for the establishment and furtherance of the Kingdom of Christ.

What you do comes from what you believe. Despite what the world says, there are only two possible belief systems, faith in Jesus Christ or faith in yourself. The latter, by the way, is what John called anti-Christ. Right now, there are those who object to any white legitimacy and every effort is to gain advantage, power, and control over them. This is racism. And it is the same way many deny Christ. They will do anything to present Christianity as illegitimate, a false religion needing to be expunged from society.

Children, it is the last hour, and as you have heard that antichrist is coming, so now many antichrists have come. Therefore we know that it is the last hour.

1 John 2:18, ESV

Many antichrists had already come in St. John’s lifetime. Many exist today. What a shame when so many people are looking for one individual to call antichrist as a prelude to the end of the world. The end of the world has come. The world that passed away was the world of the Old Covenant. It was replaced with the New Covenant (see Jerimiah 31). The new world is the Kingdom of God, the New Jerusalem. “He told them another parable. “The kingdom of heaven is like leaven that a woman took and hid in three measures of flour, till it was all leavened.”” (Matthew 13:33, ESV) The Kingdom is being worked by God throughout the world.

Who are you? An enemy of God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit? or a child of the most high who is blessed with every spiritual blessing in Christ (Ephesians 1)? Remember, even the demons and evil spirits know.

The earth is the Lord’s and the fullness thereof,  
     the world and those who dwell therein,  
for he has founded it upon the seas  
     and established it upon the rivers.  
Who shall ascend the hill of the Lord?  
     And who shall stand in his holy place?  
He who has clean hands and a pure heart,  
     who does not lift up his soul to what is false  
     and does not swear deceitfully.  
He will receive blessing from the Lord  
     and righteousness from the God of his salvation.  
Such is the generation of those who seek him,  
     who seek the face of the God of Jacob. 
                                                                         (Psalm 24:1–6, ESV) 
 

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Filed under Faith, Hate, Humanism, Racism, Truth

The Great Divide

A Sermon

Now at Iconium they entered together into the Jewish synagogue and spoke in such a way that a great number of both Jews and Greeks believed. But the unbelieving Jews stirred up the Gentiles and poisoned their minds against the brothers. So they remained for a long time, speaking boldly for the Lord, who bore witness to the word of his grace, granting signs and wonders to be done by their hands. But the people of the city were divided; some sided with the Jews and some with the apostles. When an attempt was made by both Gentiles and Jews, with their rulers, to mistreat them and to stone them, they learned of it and fled to Lystra and Derbe, cities of Lycaonia, and to the surrounding country, and there they continued to preach the gospel.” (Acts 14:1–7, ESV)

Our world is seriously divided today. The divisions are greater than almost anytime I can remember, though the Civil Rights movement along with the protests against the Vietnam military action (war) were pretty serious too. Yet there was a significant difference. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a man of peace and he worked hard to keep the civil rights battle non-violent. He did not sacrifice his principles, and what he was calling for was a specific change. Everyone, especially now, should read again and again that famous speech King made on August 28, 1963. You can find it here.

Today, the violence in our major cities is irrational. How can such destruction, crime, and death result in life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness? I am afraid that there are some people who in the past, restrained by the Spirit of God, simply want to destroy anything they can see and touch. As in Iconium, their minds have been poisoned by unscrupulous leaders, university professors, politicians, and just plain anti-nomians.

At the same time, the American churches have forgotten the gospel. We have remembered part of it; the part with God’s love and grace. We have preached that anyone and everyone can enter the Kingdom if they would believe in Jesus Christ. But we have forgotten the hard part.

“Do not think that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I have not come to bring peace, but a sword. For I have come to set a man against his father, and a daughter against her mother, and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law. And a person’s enemies will be those of his own household. Whoever loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me, and whoever loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. And whoever does not take his cross and follow me is not worthy of me. Whoever finds his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life for my sake will find it.” (Matthew 10:34–39, ESV)

These words of Jesus are an echo of the prophecy of Micah:

The godly has perished from the earth, and there is no one upright among mankind; they all lie in wait for blood, and each hunts the other with a net. Their hands are on what is evil, to do it well; the prince and the judge ask for a bribe, and the great man utters the evil desire of his soul; thus they weave it together. The best of them is like a brier, the most upright of them a thorn hedge. The day of your watchmen, of your punishment, has come; now their confusion is at hand. Put no trust in a neighbor; have no confidence in a friend; guard the doors of your mouth from her who lies in your arms; for the son treats the father with contempt, the daughter rises up against her mother, the daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law; a man’s enemies are the men of his own house. But as for me, I will look to the Lord; I will wait for the God of my salvation; my God will hear me.” (Micah 7:2–7, ESV)

It is frightening how the words from the ancient past accurately describe what we are living today. The basic truth, though, has never changed. All humanity is effectively separated from God by sin. The promise of Christ who would come to bring reconciliation would naturally cause the division between God and humanity to the fore. Those who look to God and Christ for their salvation do find it and experience forgiveness of sin and relationship with the Creator of all that is.

However, from Adam throughout all time, there are those who make the choice to oppose Christ and his salvation. They have a better way. And so, as in Iconium, peace becomes division all because many turned their lives to the one and only God. And division plots violence against God and his people. Haven’t you wondered why Americans tolerate every religion under the sun except Christianity? Could it be because Christians answer to a greater God and have his authoritative word? To make accommodation to any governments of the world is to deny the rule of Jesus Christ.

I am not suggesting that Christians become opposition to the government. Some have taken it this way. But we are to remain apart from the world while respecting the government as an instrument of God preserving life and order while he continues to gather his sheep. And that is the real problem. For decades, we have allowed human ideas to prevail over godly ideals. We have trusted the ungodly to educate our children naively thinking they had no agenda other than reading, writing and arithmetic. Once it became too late, we discovered that all humanistic education was a transforming of young minds slowly, generation by generation, until we arrive to a world that has not taught our children how to reason and think but what to think without reason.

So, in 2020 we have arrived. The great divide between God and man is before us in dramatic fashion. Jesus said it would happen and this is not the first time it is happening. And now can be the Church’s finest hour, or its saddest. We call all people to the gospel. We call them to the love of Christ who died for them. We call them to the grace of God who sent is Son to die for them.

When Jesus said he would bring a division between parent and child, he was not saying the child must stop loving the parent or the parent must stop loving their child in order to love God and become a disciple of Christ. He was saying that there must be a priority of love. “Whoever finds his live will lose it, and whoever loses his life for my sake will find it.” The great chasm between God and man has been bridged by the love of God. When the Spirit brings Christ’s reconciliation and applies it to me, I become a different me; one who loves the Lord my God with all my heart, all my strength, and all my mind.

The divide will be closed one day. Jesus will return to the earth for his final judgment. He will separate his sheep from the goats, his wheat from the chaff. It is interesting to me that in Acts 14, what has been translated as “unbelieving Jews” is really “disobedient Jews.” The “Jews” part is not what is important and to be clear, disobedient Jews implies there were obedient Jews. Paul was one. But the interesting part is that disobedience is really the foundation of all unbelief. Opposition to God, oppositions to God ordained government, opposition to the Word of Truth is what we are facing in our world today.

The judgment of God comes in many forms, and the rebellion and irrationality of violence may be one of them. But it is God who judges. We do not bring judgment on anyone. However, as my mother always said, actions speak louder than words, and we can discern those who love God from those who do not by their actions. And seeing so many who have been led astray must break our hearts. Because we have the only answer there is.

Nevertheless, division will remain, and Christian faith will always be a matter of bearing a cross. You can label the division however you like:

  • Democrat versus Republican
  • Conservative versus Liberal
  • White versus Black or Black versus White
  • Educated versus Uneducated
  • Rich versus poor

When all is said and done, none of these divisions, perceived or real, is what Jesus Christ will look for when he returns. There is only one great division from which all others flow: the division between those who believe and those who don’t. Care must be taken by those who believe, for we all know that our faith was not something we could produce on our own. Neither is it possible for the unbeliever to turn from their disobedience apart from the grace of God and the Holy Spirit.

In the meantime, we who believe must pray for peace and proclaim the gospel always and everywhere. It is our calling. The Truth proclaimed is for those who do not believe that they may believe, or that they have no excuse when Christ returns.

Maranatha. Come quickly Lord Jesus. And make us faithful.

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Filed under Hate, Love, Missional Church, World View

The Power of Ideas

…I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.” (Matthew 16:18, ESV)

In 1948, Richard Weaver, professor of English at the University of Chicago, published a book titled “Ideas Have Consequences.” Weaver’s philosophical approach has been debated over the past 70 years, but I have no doubt in the power of ideas. Ideas, whether true or not, real or unreal, determine what we believe and how we choose to act. The ability to communicate one’s ideas can result in the creation of powerful movements that can change everything. You can debate what Weaver means by the phrase and how he works his idea out in the book, but i don’t know how you can debate the statement that ideas have consequences.

I think this claim can be tied to the words of St. Paul, “For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers over this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places.” (Ephesians 6:12, ESV) When he speaks about the fight the Church is in, he removes the individual element. In other words, our fight is not with people, our fight is with ideas that are contrary to the reign of God Almighty, ideas that are evil.

The Church may fight this battle well. It might not. That is for God to judge. However, historically, when the Church built by Jesus Christ wages the battle with ideas well, amazing things happen. You can contrast such battle with the differences between the American Revolution and the French Revolution. One resulted in the creation of a powerful nation consisting of the protection of life, liberty, and prosperity. The other ended in chaos and resulted in the rise of a tyrant who made himself Emperor.

Ideas have consequences, and the current strife today is about ideas. Black people (not all, or even most necessarily, but the most vocal) believe that their lives and the lives of their children are at risk because police are out of control. I am not going to debate whether this claim is reasonable, true, or false. It is accepted as true by many and their words and deeds are the result of this belief.

As the Church, our duty to Christ is not to make this situation into a battle between black and white or any individual people. That is an error being made on both sides. “I don’t like your idea so I don’t like you.” “I am threatened by your idea so I am threatened by you.” The moment we stop reasonable attempts at a common solution, we devolve into crimes against humanity, and this has happened on both sides.

My Christian sisters and brothers, Jesus declared that he would build his Church. That is the reason we are brothers and sisters, no matter what our differences may be. He also proclaimed that the greatest power of evil would not be able to destroy the Church, his body. Do we believe it?

If we embrace the idea of Christ, what do we have to fear? They may tear down statues, we can replace them if we desire. But the statue is not the issue. The hatred toward what the statue seemingly represents is an idea that must be challenged. If we can remove our shock at the action and address the idea behind it, we will demonstrate the truth of the Word of Christ and the power of his Church.

There appears to be no end to the recent attempts to “undo” that which makes “Western Culture.” This is a dangerous and evil idea. It is dangerous because it is an emotional response to a perceived wrong. The consequence so far may not have reached the level of the French Revolution; people are not being ushered en masse to the guillotine. Interestingly, many of the recent statues destroyed have been bu cutting off the head. But it is more dangerous because the perceived wrong has not be defined beyond the most general of terms: four police officers killed a man by the use of excessive force so all police officers are out of control and we must remove the police entirely.

Isn’t it sad that the argument being made is so similar to the arguments made by slave owners? This is the evil. You did it to me so it is right for me to do it to you. Almost no one of any ethnicity would deny the wrong done to so many by slavery and later Jim Crow and other unwritten prejudices. Didn’t our mothers tell us that two wrongs don’t make a right? No matter how things appear, you cannot win a war of fire fighting fire. You can only burn everything to the ground. Then what do you have?

Such is the second reason the attempts to destroy “Western Culture” is evil. Get rid of history that cannot be changed. Destroy statues and monuments that have nothing to do with the declared issue. Go back hundreds of years and prevent the racist music written by racist men. Do it all. What do you have left? Nothing. Emptiness. Waste.

So, we must look for other answers and other ways to address the issues. And as the Church, we have such an answer.

“You have heard that it was said to those of old, ‘You shall not murder; and whoever murders will be liable to judgment.’ But I say to you that everyone who is angry with his brother will be liable to judgment; whoever insults his brother will be liable to the council; and whoever says, ‘You fool!’ will be liable to the hell of fire.” (Matthew 5:21–22, ESV)

“You have heard that it was said, ‘An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.’ But I say to you, Do not resist the one who is evil. But if anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also. And if anyone would sue you and take your tunic, let him have your cloak as well. And if anyone forces you to go one mile, go with him two miles. Give to the one who begs from you, and do not refuse the one who would borrow from you.” (Matthew 5:38–42, ESV)

“You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you,” (Matthew 5:43–44, ESV)

“…and forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.” (Matthew 6:12–15, ESV)

Our battles do not need to become physical. To destroy any property that does not belong to you comes from a wrong idea. To kill another human being comes from an evil idea. But to love one another, if you care for others as you would have them care for you, this is the idea of God who created you, cares for you, and loves you as his creation.

The Church can ill afford to get involved in such destructiveness, whether in actuality or through justifying the sinful deeds of others. There are no excuses for evil thoughts, intentions, or actions. There is only reason to love one another with or without agreement. Stop the destruction of civilization. We are not animals. We do not survive without love, without purpose, without tending to one another and the creation around us.

Pursue righteousness, godliness, faith, love, steadfastness, gentleness. Fight the good fight of the faith. Take hold of the eternal life to which you were called and about which you made the good confession in the presence of many witnesses.” (1 Timothy 6:11–12, ESV)

That’s an idea we all can live with.

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Filed under Faith, Hate, Love, Racism

From Below

He said to them, “You are from below; I am from above. You are of this world; I am not of this world.” (John 8:23, ESV)

The eight chapter of John applies to us very nicely, in my opinion. It begins with the religious leaders of the day (the self-proclaimed righteous) bringing a woman to Jesus for judgment. He is told that this woman has been caught in adultery. Now they pose a question to Jesus which none of them could possibly answer. This is not because they wanted to know the truth, but because they knew there were only two ways he could answer, and in their thinking, either answer would be wrong.

So, they present the following dilemma to the Lord of heaven and earth: The Law of Moses required that a woman caught in adultery must be stoned (their phasing of the Law, not God’s). So if Jesus refuses to stone her he is supposedly in violation of God’s Law. However, if he does stone her, he is in violation of Roman law. Aha! They’ve got him!

The first flaw with their trap is a legal one. The Law in Deuteronomy and Leviticus demands that the man and the woman who commit adultery together must die (Leviticus 20:10; Deuteronomy 22:20-24). In this accusation, where is the man? Jesus need not do anything without both defendants. Furthermore, we only have the Pharisees word that she was an adulterous woman but there are no legally required two witnesses. Without knowing it (though they should have) the testers have trapped themselves as not really knowing or applying the Law correctly.

Yet Jesus is not one to let a learning moment go by unanswered. Neither does he fall into a debate with those who have already convinced themselves that they are right. So, Jesus drives home his point silently. He bends down and writes on the ground with his finger. No speculation here is warranted. If God wanted us to know what Jesus wrote, it would have been recorded. Whatever it was, the Pharisees demand an answer and continue to badger him with repeating the question over and over.

Thus, Jesus stands back up and gives an answer that no one, not even the woman expected, “Let him who is without sin among you be the first to throw a stone at her.” Ouch! Not at all what the expected or wanted to hear. Another human foolish testing of God fails. After they all leave, Jesus graciously addresses the woman and gives her forgiveness. Though I am sure the Pharisees didn’t learn their lesson, I believe she learned hers. It’s what Jesus did repeatedly, cast down the proud and lift up the humble.

But that is only the beginning of the chapter, and though I will not spend time on everything worthy of reflection and study, later Jesus addressed the Jews who had heard him teach and believed in him. “So Jesus said to the Jews who had believed him, “If you abide in my word, you are truly my disciples, and you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.”” (John 8:31–32, ESV)

I have heard the last phrase repeated often in religious and non-religious circles. “You will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.” I first want to note that I lose patience with those who deny God and Christ and who repeatedly quote him as if all of a sudden they believe. Please stop it.

However, those who confess they believe do something I consider far worse. In the first case, unbelievers only reveal their duplicity and hypocrisy. But believers steal a phrase out of context to justify something they want to be true, even if it is not. The freedom of truth is not unconditional. Jesus gives two conditions to knowing the truth: 1) “If you abide in my word,” and 2) you are my disciples.

None of us can or do know truth apart from the Word of God. While Jesus walked this earth, the Word of God included the Scriptures (Old Testament) and himself! (John 1:1) Now, the Word which is Christ is recorded and kept for us today in the New Testament. The easiest way of stating this is, if you want to know truth, you have to know all of God’s word.

The objection I hear to this is that there are many brilliant people who know much about the world through science, math, medicine, and more, who do not believe in the Bible, God, or Christ. You have no argument with me. God has revealed himself in his word from the very beginning: “And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light.” (Genesis 1:3, ESV) The sciences in their purest form are the study of this world that God created. But the recognition of God through the sciences is another matter altogether. Not only can it be done, but it should be done if one is seeking truth.

For what can be known about God is plain to them, because God has shown it to them. For his invisible attributes, namely, his eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly perceived, ever since the creation of the world, in the things that have been made. So they are without excuse.” (Romans 1:19–20, ESV) Paul doesn’t hedge about the truth, “Professing to be wise, they became fools.” Sounds a lot like the Pharisees in John 8.

Any discipline that does not reveal God and Christ is not the fault of the truth but of the one practicing the discipline with a presupposed believe that there is no God or Christ. This is the problem with all public education and in most universities. They start with a denial of God and then claim to be interested in truth. This is in itself a lie.

The second qualification to truth must therefore be emphasized, “you are truly my disciples.” Abiding in the the word means a constant relationship of word to life, and this is what defines being a disciple. A disciple is a follower, one committed to someone or something.

The issue I have with many social justice issues in general and Black Lives Matters in particular is that they are dishonest attempts to find and apply truth. They are dishonest in that they begin with a position that is prejudicial against all other positions. They are dishonest because they are not open to discussion or debate about the idea or the facts used to make their version of the truth win out. They are dishonest because, knowing they do not have truth on their side, they abandon the truth and fall into the fallacy of name calling destroying their opponents and the destruction of their property and lives.

In America today, it is nearly impossible to have intelligent discussions about abortion, traditional marriage, real discrimination, racism, politics and a whole lot more. It is impossible because one side tends to abandon reason, debate, and logic and defer to outbursts, shouting, overbearing accusations, and more. A most obvious example is the failure of our universities which are supposed to be safe havens for seeking and testing truth but have become impenetrable fortresses of one position and one position only. If you disagree with the agenda, there is no room for debate. Worse, if you are on the wrong side, you are not even free to speak.

Many are upset by the destruction of statues, monuments, etc. honoring people who were instrumental in founding and running America. Such destruction is only a symptom of the real problem: they have already destroyed the principles of government established by the greatest of our fore-fathers.

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.—That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed…” (The Declaration of Independence)

“We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.” (The Constitution of the United States of America)

“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

“Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

“But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” Abraham Lincoln~November 19, 1863

We who are of this world will never be able to resolve the issues that face us until we become disciples of he who is from above. Peace only comes from the Prince of Peace.

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Blinded by Hate

Beloved, I am writing you no new commandment, but an old commandment that you had from the beginning. The old commandment is the word that you have heard. At the same time, it is a new commandment that I am writing to you, which is true in him and in you, because the darkness is passing away and the true light is already shining. Whoever says he is in the light and hates his brother is still in darkness. Whoever loves his brother abides in the light, and in him there is no cause for stumbling. But whoever hates his brother is in the darkness and walks in the darkness, and does not know where he is going, because the darkness has blinded his eyes.” (1 John 2:7–11, ESV)

What happened to George Floyd was a crime, legally and morally. It is not the first time such a crime has ever been committed in the name of law and order. The murder of Mr. Floyd, whether intentional or thoughtlessness is repulsive any way I look at it. Rightly, it has sparked protest and the review of policies in police departments around the country.

There have been many programs on television analyzing and debating the reaction to what is going on. Most of the ones I have watched sympathize with the desire to rid America of the racism that is and has been so prevalent. Few of them really offer any kind of answer or strategy to change our culture. Some call for revolution, others for better communication. Who is talking about the heart?

I believe that the beginning is the presuppositions we all bring to the issue. We all have to start somewhere and our default starting place is always our world view. Foundational world views are not taught in schools as much as they are taught at home and on the streets and playgrounds. Unless we are conscious of our world view, we can never hope to change it. More importantly is that we are impotent when it comes to changing another’s world view.

Jesus told us to take the log out of our own eye before we try to get the speck out of another’s. That commands me to look to myself first, not to build up walls against others but to become vulnerable enough to honestly discover my “log.” We are all by nature in the dark. We all want to point the finger somewhere else. We all want to fix the problem but we don’t want the discomfort of realizing that we are each the problem.

One of the world view changes I think we all need is the recognition that the concept of race erroneous. Race can only exist if the mythical theory of evolution is true. Why are we afraid of accepting that we are all descendants of Eve and Adam? We are all the race of humankind. I think it is because being the children of Adam and Eve we must bear the responsibility of sin. Herein lies the root of the problem.

John said it well: “Whoever loves his brother abides in the light, and in him there is no cause for stumbling. But whoever hates his brother is in the darkness and walks in the darkness, and does not know where he is going, because the darkness has blinded his eyes.” Our society is stumbling around in the dark because hatred has blinded us. The only way out is to love one another.

However, love is not the kind of love we have created. Most of our romantic ideas of love are merely a desire to find true love. Unable to do that, we make love a biological reaction. We hate our humanity and become as animals. We hate life an promote death wherever we can. John tells us that God is love. He does not say that God loves everyone and everything indiscriminately. He says that love is the very nature of God. In other words, When we live bearing the image of God, we live lovingly. And to love God is to love one another.

It seems so simple. Love instead of hate. Yet it feels so impossible because we have not loved God, we have loved to be god. There is only one way to become true lovers of God and neighbor which is to restore the image of God with which we were created. Unable to save ourselves, Jesus who is God sacrificed himself to save us. In Christ Jesus we learn again to love as God is love.

For me, racism does not exist, but ethnic hatred does. When it gets down to it, ethnic hatred sounds really silly. It makes not sense other than it is a growth of our hatred of our selves. We are created to bring forth the glory of God. Hating to do that is the self-hatred that grows into other-person-hatred. Years ago Rodney King said, “Can’t we just all get along?” We cannot. That is, we cannot get along or find any kind of peace until we remove the log from our own eye and allow Christ to make us again into who we are to be.

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Filed under Hate, Love, Racism, World View